Apply for a Reentry Permit Online

One-on-one Online Immigration Attorney

Reentry Permit

Pay Only for the Service You Need

Self-Help

Fill out the application forms online and download your completed application. Edit your forms as many times as you need.

$

759

  • Attorney fee: $99.
  • USCIS Fee: $660
  • Input your application info on our website.
  • We send your completed application forms to your email.
  • Edit and download your application as many times as you need.
  • No attorney review of your application.
  • No attorney consultation.
  • You print, sign, and mail the completed forms and application fee to USCIS.
  • You monitor the status of your application.
  • You respond to any RFEs.
  • All information you provide is protected by the attorney-client privilege and is never sold or disclosed to third parties.
  • Upgrade at any time.

Premium

U.S. immigration attorney reviews your application, corrects any errors, answers your questions, mails your application to USCIS, monitors your application, and responds to any RFEs.

$

1,160

  • Attorney Fee: $500
  • USCIS Fee: $660
  • Input your application info on our website.
  • U.S. immigration attorney reviews your application and corrects any errors.
  • Unlimited attorney consultation about this application.
  • Attorney mails your completed forms and application fee to USCIS.
  • Attorney monitors your application and updates you at every step.
  • Attorney respond to any RFEs.
  • All information you provide is protected by the attorney-client privilege and is never sold or disclosed to third parties.

What is a Reentry Permit?

  • Allows Permanent Residents (Green Card holders) to remain outside the U.S. for up to two years.
  • If a Permanent Resident will be outside the U.S. for more than one year, you must have a reentry permit to return to the U.S.
  • If a permanent resident will be outside the U.S. for more than six months, a reentry permit is recommended but not required.

Who can apply for a Reentry Permit?

  • You must be a Permanent Resident (Green Card holder).
  • You must be physically present in the U.S.at the time of application.
  • You must be physically present in the U.S. to provide fingerprints.

Required Documents

  • Passport
  • Permanent Resident Card (Green Card)
  • Copy of expired reentry permit (if applicable)
  • Original unexpired reentry permit (if applicable)

Steps to Apply for a Reentry Permit

1. Fill out online application

Input all required information, upload  documents, and pay the fee. All online.

Basic and Premium Plan: Our attorney reviews your application for completeness.

10 minutes

2. Sign your completed application

You print and sign your application forms. 


3. Submit application to USCIS

Mail your application to the correct USCIS address.

Premium Plan: We assemble and submit your application to USCIS.

4. USCIS receives application

USCIS sends you a text message to confirm receipt of your application and mails an official receipt notice.

Premium Plan: We also receive each USCIS notice and update you at each step.

~ 1 month after submission

5. USCIS schedules fingerprints

USCIS mails a notice indicating when and where you must have your fingerprints taken.

Premium Plan: We also receive each USCIS notice and update you at each step.

~ 2 months after submission

6. You provide fingerprints

You arrive at the designated time and location to have your fingerprints taken at a USCIS office in the U.S.

~ 3 months after submission

7. USCIS processes application

USCIS reviews your application and makes a decision.

Premium Plan: We 

8. Approved!

USCIS will mail a notice of approval and your reentry permit to the address you designated in your application.

~ 4-7 months after submission

Reentry Permit Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is a reentry permit?

A: A reentry permit is an U.S. immigration document that allows permanent residents to stay outside the U.S. for long periods of time without losing their permanent resident status. If you will be outside the U.S. for over one year, you must have a reentry permit to return to the U.S.

Q: How many times can I obtain a reentry permit?

A: There is no set limit. But if you are outside the U.S. for 4 of the past 5 years, USCIS may issue you a reentry permit that is valid for only 1 year or may decline to issue you a reentry permit.

Q: I am currently outside the U.S. Can I apply for a reentry permit?

A: No. You must be physically present in the U.S. when USCIS receives your application. You also have to be physically present in the U.S. to provide fingerprints at a USCIS office. You can leave the U.S. between these dates and after you provide fingerprints.

Q: Can I leave the U.S. between the time I submit my reentry permit application and the time I have my fingerprints taken?

A: Yes. You have to be physically present in the U.S. when USCIS receives your application. You can then leave the U.S. But you must return to the U.S. to provide fingerprints at a USCIS office. After you have your fingerprints taken, you can leave the U.S. before your reentry permit is approved.

Q: My reentry permit has not expired yet. Can I apply for a new reentry permit? 

A: Yes. If your reentry permit has not yet expired, you can apply for a new reentry permit, but you must mail your original, unexpired reentry permit to USCIS together with your application for a new reentry permit.

Q: I plan to leave the U.S. for 4 months. Do I need a reentry permit?

A: No. If you will be in the U.S. for at least 6 months during any 12-month period, you do not need a reentry permit. If you plan to be outside the U.S. for more than 6 months in any 12-month period, it is a good idea to have a reentry permit. If you will be outside the U.S. for more than one year, you must have a reentry permit to return to the U.S. 

Q: After I receive my reentry permit, do I have to stay outside the U.S. for the whole two years?

A: No. A reentry permit allows a permanent resident to remain outside the U.S. for up to two years. But you can return to the U.S. at any time and as often as you like. 

Q: I am a U.S. citizen. I plan to live outside the U.S. for several years. Do I need a reentry permit?

A: No. A U.S. citizen does not need and cannot apply for a reentry permit. U.S. citizens can remain outside the U.S. indefinitely. Only permanent residents who plan to remain outside the U.S. for more than one year need a reentry permit. 

Q: What are some reasons that a reentry permit application might be denied?

A: A reentry permit application can be denied or delayed for several reasons:

  • The applicant currently has a valid reentry permit but does not submit the unexpired reentry permit to USCIS together with the application for a new reentry permit.
  • The application contains incorrect information or the applicant does not submit all required documents.
  • The applicant fails to pay the correct USCIS processing fee.

Q: How much is the USCIS government fee for a reentry permit?

A: The current USCIS fee for a reentry permit is $660.

Q: How long does it take to get a reentry permit?

A: It takes about 4-7 months to receive a reentry permit. But as long as you provide fingerprints in the U.S., you can leave the U.S. before your reentry permit is approved. 

Q: I live in California. Can you help me apply for a reentry permit?

A: Yes. Our law firm is in New York, but as long as you can input your information on our site and upload your documents, we can prepare your reentry permit application for you. You will be assigned a USCIS office to provide fingerprints based on your address, not ours. 

Q: I am a permanent resident. How long can I stay outside the U.S.?

A: Permanent residents (green card holders) should stay in the U.S. for a total of at least 6 months in any 12-month period. If you are outside the U.S. for for more than 6 months in any 12-month period, it is safer to have a reentry permit. If you will be outside the U.S. longer than one year, you must have a reentry permit to return to the U.S.

Q: I heard that I only have to come back to the U.S. one day every six months. 

A: That is incorrect. To maintain your permanent resident status, it is safest to be in the U.S. for a total of 6 months in any 12-month period or obtain a reentry permit. A reentry permit allows you to stay outside the U.S. for up to 2 years.

Q: I obtained a 2-year conditional green card through a marriage petition. Can I apply for a reentry permit?

A: Yes. But your reentry permit will expire on the date that your conditional green card expires. Also, please consider how your application for a 10-year green card will be affected if you have an extended absence from your spouse.

Q: I submitted Form I-751 to remove the conditions on my 2-year conditional green card. Can I apply for a reentry permit?

A: Yes. After you submit your Form I-751, you will receive a notice from USCIS indicating that your permanent resident status is extended for 18 months. You can apply for a reentry permit, but the effective date of your reentry permit will expire at the end of that 18-month period.

Q: How long is a reentry permit valid?

A: Almost all reentry permits are valid for 2 years. If you are a permanent resident who has been outside the U.S. for at least 4 of the past 5 years, USCIS may issue you a reentry permit that is valid for only 1 year or may deny your application. 

Q: Can I leave the U.S. immediately after submitting my reentry permit application. 

A: No. There are two important dates during which you must be in the U.S. First, you must be in the U.S. when USCIS receives your reentry permit application. Second, you must be in the U.S. to provide fingerprints to USCIS. You can leave the U.S. between those two dates. You can also leave the U.S. after you provide fingerprints. 

Q: My current reentry permit will expire soon. I am still outside the U.S. Can I renew my reentry permit outside the U.S.?

A: No. You cannot "renew" a reentry permit. You must return to the U.S. and apply for a new reentry permit. 

Q: Will having a reentry permit 100% guarantee that I can return to the U.S. in the future?

A: No. Every time you return to the U.S., CBP makes a determination of whether you are admissible. Having a reentry permit means that CBP will not deem you to have abandoned your residency status simply because you have been outside the U.S. for up to two years. However, if you have a criminal record, lie, or provide false documents, CBP can deny you entry to the U.S. for these reasons.

Q: Can I use the reentry permit to remain outside the U.S. for more than two years and then return to the U.S. and apply for a new reentry permit?

A: No. You must return to the U.S. before your reentry permit expires. You can then apply for a new reentry permit in the U.S. and leave after USCIS has received your reentry permit application.

Q: I previously applied for asylum. Now I want to return to my home country. Can I use this form?

A: No. Please contact your asylum attorney. 

Q: I am not a permanent resident. I do not have a green card. Can I apply for a reentry permit?

A: No. The information on this page is only for permanent residents (green card holders) who need a reentry permit. 

Q: Is an interview required to obtain a reentry permit?

A: No. You will have to go in person to a USCIS office to have your fingerprints taken, but there is no interview. 

Apply for a Reentry Permit with confidence.

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